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What We’re Reading in AI This Month: April 2017 Edition

What We’re Reading in AI This Month: April 2017 Edition

Time for Mighty AI’s monthly AI news roundup! Here’s some of the best stuff we read about computer vision, natural language and other AI applications in April:

  • We learned from Motherboard how NASA’s forgotten search engine for moon rocks gave AI a boost. Read.  
  • Quartz looks at how Atomwise attempts to generate life-saving drugs with AI faster than human teams can produce them. Read.
  • The Atlantic looks at how AI will redefine HI (human intelligence) … with a bit of nostalgia for children of the ‘80s thrown in for good measure. Read.
  • Digital Trends highlights a team of researchers in the UK who have created a computer vision algorithm that is outperforming medical doctors in predicting heart attacks. Read.
  • This very practical primer on machine learning for product managers published in Hacker Noon. Read.
  • This Medium post looks at how Google Trends in “machine learning” offers a peek at the spike in papers submitted on the topic, including which keywords are hot (and not). Read.
  • Postcards from the Frontiers of Science demonstrates how AI gets a sense of humor with neural network knock knock jokes (try saying that five times fast). Natural language processing, FTW! Read.
  • Reuters shows us child-size robots help kids with autism learn social skills. Watch.
  • TechCrunch tells us about a Boston Consulting Group study predicting that up to 25% of all driving miles in the U.S. could be driven by self-driving electric vehicles by 2030. Read.
  • The first world chess champion to be defeated by a computer nearly 20 years ago pontificates in The Wall Street Journal on how humans should think about intelligent machines. Read.
  • Forbes makes a case for why we need to democratize artificial intelligence education. Read.
  • The Verge explores how AI can help people avoid taking embarrassingly bad selfies. Read.
  • Canada ponies up $93M in funds to promote artificial intelligence in its academies. Read.
  • Futurism displays skepticism on the viability of a universal basic income. Read.  
  • Marketplace offers an interactive quiz and the latest data on which jobs are (and are not) “robot-proof.” Read.
  • The New York Times reports on findings from a group of economists and computer scientists who think America needs new tools to track technology’s impact on jobs. Read.
  • The Wall Street Journal speaks with Elon Musk about his plans to meld brains and computers. Read.
  • The Alan Turing Institute explores the benefits of connecting data and human psychology. Read.
  • IEEE Spectrum tells us about an algorithm that aims to predict bickering among couples. Read.
  • Bloomberg reveals the humans hiding behind the chatbots. Read.
  • The Verge reports that NuTonomy will test its autonomous cars in Boston—a city whose drivers AllState has repeatedly named the worst in America—giving the vehicles the opportunity to train on more complicated roads. Read.

 

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